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Emily Davis Adams Takes on Levitated Mass

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Those who say Michael Heizer’s Levitated Mass is nothing more than a big rock are not wrong if they are focusing on the object nature of the work. As an experiential encounter, however, the monumental monolith does perform. Emily Davis Adams skillfully recreates this relational engagement in Painting of Levitated Mass currently on view at CB1 Gallery. Though produced in her …

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Kaz Oshiro Pushing and Folding

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Just over a decade ago, gorgeously pink stacked Marshall speakers stood like photogenic rock stars on an unlike stage that was the Hammer Museum. With only stretched canvases, Bondo, and meticulous paint job, Kaz Oshiro humorously made his mark. Ed Ruscha talked about wanting one type of art over the other: rather Huh? Wow! than Wow! Huh? Oshiro’s sculpted painting …

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East West Flower Color Riot Pilot

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Twelve artists from Japan and the U.S. pack the small gallery of Eastside International with plenty of fun, in what amounts to a party atmosphere. Riot of Flowers — the third and final installment of exhibitions aimed at bringing contemporary Japanese artists to the Southland, curated by Los Angeles artist Kio Griffith — lands with a pyrotechnic bang of summertime …

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Sally Bruno Has Some Fun

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Tedious labor is oh so hard, let alone fun. But Sally Bruno shows otherwise, that having a good time while subjecting to a taxing, monotonous regimen is in fact an option. Bruno’s richly texturized paintings at LAM Gallery are orderly fun and peculiarly pleasant — imagine geeking out with close friends while consuming a modest amount of spiked fruit punch …

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Beyond Infinity Goes Nano Rubio

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Buzz Lightyear launches into flight. He hollers, “To infinity… and beyond!” Take it from the brave, jet-powered toy astronaut. Reaching the outermost expanse of the interminable universe — or a kid’s playroom — is only a part of the adventure. The purpose of life is found in wanting to go over the edge of the final destination to see what …

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Jason Kunke’s Romantic Material Frontier

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At Monte Vista Projects, Jason Kunke’s romantic A Good Wall simultaneously travels back and forward in time and space, spanning the millennial distance of the Wild Wide West and Red Planet. The showdown consists of matte black fake neon signs, complete with cord and plug, which are fabricated entirely of steel, and somber, eerie Martian landscapes painted with what the …

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When It Works, Sarah Cain Kills

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Appropriated from Beyoncé, Sarah Cain in Bow Down at Honor Fraser winks at the notion of advancing feminist agendas in art from within the boundaries of the creative stage. Her alignment with the pop culture diva is a cunning choice, as she asserts the position of power and authority in the spotlight; Cain nods to the idea of choreographing earnest …

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To Hide or Show or Something in Between

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In Benjamin Hoff’s The Tao of Pooh, the beloved bear describes his happiest moment as the very instance just before the honey touches his tongue. The anticipation of a big reveal is more precious than the reward itself; the taste of the honey is sweeter while in waiting. In To Hide To Show, a group exhibition at MAMA Gallery, seven …

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Meet Beguiling Colin Glasgow

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Quietly hung inside the sun house of a private residence in Los Angeles, Colin Glasgow’s paintings and photographs of eccentric landscapes are filled with seemingly familiar gardens, colored and glittered with borderline NC-17 sensuality. If the lush, succulent urban oasis — of what was once essentially a desert — is to be seen as the embodiment of Hollywood’s manufactured illusion …

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Morning Dawns, Even After Atom Bombs

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Soon after its release in 1970, Sensou wo Shiranai Kodomotachi (translated to Children Who Do Not Know the War) topped the Japanese music chart. By that time, Japan had willed itself from the aftermath of the postwar era, even successfully hosting the Olympics in 1964. In the traveling exhibition Metamorphosis of Japan After the War: 1945-1964, currently making its only …